Welcome to our New Board Members

We would like to welcome our three new Board Members to the National Indigenous Economic Development Board. In October 2020, we welcomed Danielle Levine, Michael Bonshor and Andy Moorhouse to the Board.

Danielle Levine BA, MBA is a Métis business educator, program designer and facilitator originally from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Danielle is an independent consultant that provides skill development, coaching, and ongoing support in entrepreneurship for Indigenous Peoples in Canada and beyond.

Michael Bonshor, CPA is a member of the Dzawada’enuxw First Nation of Kingcome Inlet.  Michael has worked with First Nations and Indigenous organizations to advance self-governance through economic development the past 20 years. He is President and CEO of Visions First Nations Financial Services/Ki’mola Indigenous Capital and Managing Director of First Nations Business Development Association (BC).

Andy Moorhouse was born in Montreal, and grew up in the northern village of Inukjuak and currently resides in Inukjuak, Nunavik. At the age of 20, he was elected in 1999 as a member of the municipal council of Inukjuak, in 2003, became the Mayor for one term from 2003 to 2005, then he gradually rose through the ranks to his most recent post of vice-president of the Makivik Corporation in charge of economic developmentAll three new Board members have extensive amounts of knowledge in Indigenous economic development and will contribute greatly to the Board’s work.

National Indigenous Economic Development Board: Opportunity for Position of Chairperson

The National Indigenous Economic Development Board (NIEDB) is the only national, non-political organization of its kind mandated to provide strategic policy advice and guidance to federal government on issues of Indigenous economic development. Board Members are appointed for various terms and may reside anywhere in Canada. The principal role of all NIEDB Board Members is to provide strategic policy and program advice to the federal government on all matters pertaining to Indigenous economic development.

Who can apply?

Candidates applying for the position of Chairperson must possess considerable and demonstrated experience as an Indigenous leader in the field of business and economic development. Governance experience, in a chair role, within a national or regional organization and recognition for achievements in this role are essential. Candidates must also be recognized and respected for their leadership, integrity, and trustworthiness by their peers and by relevant communities of interest.

Candidates proposed for appointment must comply with the requirements of the Conflict of Interest Act as well as the ethical and political activity guidelines for part-time public office holders.

The Government is committed to ensuring appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as employment equity and diversity with respect to women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and visible minorities.

Deadline:

Applications for the role of Chairperson will be accepted until September 15, 2020.

How to apply:

Please send the following items to the contact listed below: a detailed, up-to-date résumé that includes your contact information and an explanation of relevant experience. 

Contact us:

National Indigenous Economic Development Board
10 Wellington Street, 17th floor
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Email: aadnc.cndeanaedbsecretariat.aandc@canada.ca

 

National Indigenous Economic Development Board: Opportunities for Future Board Members

The National Indigenous Economic Development Board (NIEDB) is the only national, non-political organization of its kind mandated to provide strategic policy advice and guidance to federal government on issues of Indigenous economic development. Board Members are appointed for various terms and may reside anywhere in Canada. The principal role of all NIEDB Board Members is to provide strategic policy and program advice to the federal government on all matters pertaining to Indigenous economic development.

Who can apply?

Candidates applying for the position of Board Member must possess considerable and demonstrated experience as an Indigenous leader in the field of business and economic development. Governance experience within a national or regional organization and recognition for achievements in this role are essential. Candidates must also be recognized and respected for their leadership, integrity, and trustworthiness by their peers and by relevant communities of interest.

Candidates proposed for appointment must comply with the requirements of the Conflict of Interest Act as well as the ethical and political activity guidelines for part-time public office holders.

The Government is committed to ensuring appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as employment equity and diversity with respect to women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and visible minorities.

Deadline:

Applications for the role of Board Member will be accepted until September 30, 2020.

How to apply:

Please send the following items to the contact listed below: a detailed, up-to-date résumé that includes your contact information and an explanation of relevant experience.

Contact us:

National Indigenous Economic Development Board
10 Wellington Street, 17th floor
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Email: aadnc.cndeanaedbsecretariat.aandc@canada.ca

 

Launch of the 2019 Indigenous Economic Reconciliation Report

The National Indigenous Economic Board (NIEDB) launches its 2019 Indigenous Economic Reconciliation Report.

Ottawa, ON – December 10, 2019 – To inform a path forward on addressing the socio-economic gap for Indigenous peoples in the context of reconciliation, the Board hosted a three-part series, in 2017 and 2018, on economic reconciliation and inclusive growth in Canada. The series was called “Expanding the Circle: What Reconciliation and Inclusive Economic Growth Can Mean for Indigenous Peoples and Canada?” These events were organized in partnership with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA), the Public Policy Forum (PPF), and the former Department of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC).

The interest in the Expanding the Circle series stems from the Board’s 2016 research which indicated that if all opportunities were equal and the Indigenous labour force was fully mobilized, it could lead to a $27.7 billion annual contribution to the Canadian GDP.

The Indigenous Economic Reconciliation Report and its recommendations are the result of what the Board heard during these forums and is informed by the Board’s 2019 Indigenous Economic Progress Report which indicates that economic outcomes have been improving overall for Indigenous peoples in Canada, but are not on track to meet 2022 targets of economic parity. The report concludes that the Government of Canada must take immediate, significant, and clear steps towards closing the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. The commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples is not a partisan issue; it is a matter of The Honour of the Crown, based on the existing Aboriginal rights upheld and recognized in Section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982. Yet, reconciliation is not solely the government’s responsibility; all Canadians must be involved.

The report is divided into two main sections. The first part focuses on four key recommendations based on common themes and issues raised during the three forums:

  1. Procurement: establish a comprehensive and easy to access directory of Indigenous businesses (similar to Australia’s Supply Nation), and provide meaningful funding to Indigenous businesses to increase awareness and readiness for procurement opportunities.
  2. Access to capital: adequately fund Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFIs), provide AFIs loan loss protections, and devolve economic development programming to AFIs.
  3. Capacity development: put in place incentives, including funding, internships and scholarships to increase Indigenous participation in business training and certification; and encourage post-secondary education institutions to increase access to these programs for Indigenous learners.
  4. Wealth sharing: implement strategies and innovative options to increase equity positions and involvement of Indigenous peoples in resource development, and to support growth of traditional economies and participation in environmental stewardship.

The second part provides an overview each of the three forums. For instance, the First Nations forum focused on concrete actions to move away from the Indian Act. The Métis forum outlined the significance of Métis rights to economic reconciliation. Finally, the Inuit forum highlighted importance of properly implementing land claims. While there were common themes across the three events, some of what the Board heard at each event was unique from the perspective of First Nations, Métis and Inuit, which speaks to the importance of providing for distinctions-based approaches to economic reconciliation.

The Board anticipates hosting three follow-up forums in 2022, as well as a follow-up report on economic reconciliation will be released in 2023 which will include data from the 2022 NIEDB Indigenous Economic Progress Report. The Board will use these tools to track, monitor, and assess the state of economic reconciliation in Canada. The Board will keep economic reconciliation and these four key areas as an ongoing topic of discussion during its meetings with ministers and government officials. The report will also be linked to a broader National Indigenous Economic Development Strategy. The Board calls upon Indigenous organizations to share this report within their networks, upon corporate Canada to concretely commit to reconciliation, and upon Canadians to educate themselves on these issues and to disseminate this information.

 


The National Indigenous Economic Development Board

Established in 1990, the NIEDB is a Governor-in-Council appointed board mandated to provide strategic policy advice to the federal government on issues related to Indigenous economic development. Composed of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis business and community leaders from across Canada, the Board helps governments respond to the unique needs and circumstances of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Victoria LaBillois and Sandra Sutter named one of Women’s Executive Network 2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women

 

The National Indigenous Economic Development Board (the Board) would like to extend its most heartfelt congratulations to Victoria LaBillois and Sandra Sutter for being named two of the Women’s Executive Network 2019 Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 Award.

Victoria and Sandra were both named in the RBC Champions category which highlights women who have made a describable difference to the advancement of women in the workplace.

Victoria LaBillois is a Mi’gmaq entrepreneur from Listuguj, Quebec, Victoria owns Wejipeg Excavation; owns rental properties; co-owns Wejuseg Construction, and is an active partner in other joint ventures. Sandra Sutter, a Cree Métis woman from the Prairies, is the Aboriginal Partnerships Manager for PTW Energy Services and CGT Industrial and the Executive Director for the Circle for Aboriginal Relations (CFAR) Society.

They are both active members of the Board, providing valuable advice to the Board’s upcoming Strategic Plan and sitting on the Board’s Indigenous Procurement and Indigenous Women Entrepreneurship Subcommittees.

We are grateful to have them on the Board and benefit from their great knowledge and experience as Indigenous women and entrepreneurs.

 


To learn more . . .

 

2019 Indigenous Economic Progress Report

Economic Outcomes Improved Overall for Indigenous Peoples in Canada but Are Not on Track to Meet 2022 Targets of Economic Parity

Closing Socio-economic Gaps would boost Canada’s economy by $27.7B annually

 Goose Bay, NL, June 10, 2019 – The 2019 Indigenous Economic Progress Report released today by the National Indigenous Economic Development Board (NIEDB) concludes that while the overall economic outcomes for Indigenous peoples are improving in Canada, this is only to varying, and sometimes small degrees. Given the pace of improvements, outcomes are not on track to meet the 2022 targets of economic parity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians.

“We’ve seen some of the greatest gains being made in the area of college and trades completion by Indigenous students, who now surpass the non-Indigenous population by 2.6 percentage points in 2016,” said Chief Clarence Louie, NIEDB Chairperson. “The deficit gap in median income levels has also significantly narrowed by 9.3 percentage points and the gap in high school completion rates has narrowed by 4.5 percentage points.”

The report finds that not all indicators have shown improvements, however, and not all improvements have occurred equally across the three Indigenous identity groups.

“The gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous employment rates has remained essentially unchanged at 8.4 percentage points in 2016 and, for university completion rates, the gap actually grew to 18.8% with a 1.7 percentage point increase,” said Ms. Dawn Madahbee Leach, NIEDB Vice-Chair. “First Nations populations on reserve also continue to demonstrate persistent and sometimes worsening outcome deficits in terms of employment rates, income, and educational levels.”

The Indigenous Economic Progress Report presents a thorough, in-depth analysis of the economic realities of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Using 13 measures, it assesses three core indicators: employment, income and community well-being. Using 19 additional measures, it also examines five underlying indicators of economic success: education, entrepreneurship and business development, governance, lands and resources, and infrastructure.

Eleven measures are new to the 2019 progress report, such as workforce representation, enhanced income and educational attainment measures, crowding and condition of housing, and community financial certification. The 2019 report also presents the results of gender analysis and introduces two new NIEDB composite indices on Economic Development and Infrastructure.

“The gender analysis reveals some interesting findings,” said Dr. Marie Delorme, NIEDB member. “We found that Indigenous populations demonstrate greater gender parity than non-Indigenous populations. We also determined that Indigenous women would benefit more from support in the areas of employment and income, while Indigenous men would benefit more from support in education.”

The 2019 report is the second progress report issued by the NIEDB since its foundational Aboriginal Economic Benchmarking Report was published in 2012. The benchmarking report set bold targets on which to track the economic progress of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people in Canada. This includes the target to achieve economic outcome parity by 2022.

“While gaps are closing, we found that they are not on track to meet our 2022 goal,” said Chief Terrance Paul, NIEDB member-at-large. “We urge government to respond to our recommendations so we can meet these targets over the next three years.”

Among its recommendations, the NIEDB advises that policies and programming should target First Nations populations on reserve in the areas of infrastructure, employment and education. It also recommends the development of youth-focused educational supports to help Indigenous peoples finish high school and continue on to post-secondary education, as well as skills development programs to help Indigenous employees of high-wage industries increase their earning potential in higher-paying roles.

“Indigenous economic development offers huge potential to improve lives, fuel Canadian economic growth, advance reconciliation, and provide a growing young workforce to Canada’s aging labour population,” said Chief Louie. “Closing this gap would boost Canada’s economy by $27.7 billion annually.”

Inuktitut media release

Infographics:

Past Reports:


The National Indigenous Economic Development Board

Established in 1990, the NIEDB is a Governor-in-Council appointed board mandated to provide strategic policy advice to the federal government on issues related to Indigenous economic development. Composed of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis business and community leaders from across Canada, the Board helps governments respond to the unique needs and circumstances of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Indigenous Economic Progress Reports

The NIEDB has produced two previous Indigenous Economic Reports to identify trends in the Indigenous economy in Canada over a 10-year period and to make recommendations. The 2019 report compares data from the 2006 Census and the 2016 Census.  The final report is expected to be released in 2023.

Northern Sustainable Food Systems Recommendations Report

On February 25, 2019, the Board launched its Northern Sustainable Food Systems Recommendations Report.

Northern sustainable food systems are a critical component of economic development in the North. Sustainable food systems support food security, leading to healthier communities, and individuals who are better able to participate in the workforce. With a healthier workforce, the economic climate is more favourable to attract and retain businesses. Improvements in employment, educational opportunities and increased incomes in turn allow for greater food security.  Northern sustainable food systems both drive economic development and benefit from the economic growth associated with new business opportunities.

Based on  internal and external research, along with findings from our Roundtable event held in Whitehorse, Yukon in June 2018 to discuss Northern Sustainable food systems with Northerners, the Board has made a suite of recommendations that address gaps in creating sustainable food systems:

  • First, we recommend a set of four policy tools designed to address traditional foods and the opportunity to contribute more reliably and sustainably to food systems in the North. These policies and programs would support hunters and facilitate the procurement of traditional foods for use in hospitals, schools and government institutions, develop appropriate marketing and management practices, and facilitate food inspections to ensure food safety regulations are met. Importantly, all of these policies would be co-developed with Indigenous governing bodies and recognize Indigenous governmental authority to make regulations respecting the harvesting and use of country/traditional foods.
  • Second, we recommend the development and enhanced involvement in a set of two programs designed to promote climate change and adaptation programs and small-scale Indigenous commercial fisheries. These programs include the support for local processing facilities to offer the greatest benefit within and for communities.   Country and traditional foods offer an irreplaceable contribution to Indigenous food systems far beyond their excellent nutritional value and supporting these endeavours now and for the future has widespread economic and community benefits.
  • Third, we recommend significant enhancements and alterations to federal subsidy programs. We recommend that The Nutrition North program focus on support for local food production and harvesting through transportation subsidies for traditional foods, and for tools and supplies used for local food production and harvesting. Further, we recommend the introduction of a Northern Basic Income Allowance and Northern indexed federal income tax rates. Additionally, we recommend economic development supports to enable locally-owned supply and distribution chains for market foods, consideration of price capping for staples and ongoing monitoring of existing food programs and food insecurity rates.
  • Fourth, we recommend an ongoing infrastructure investment strategy that honours previous fiscal commitments and continues to focus on transportation infrastructure (marine, air and ground) maintenance and enhancements. Deep water port construction, airport improvements, and road enhancements are all required to ensure remote and isolated communities maintain distribution networks and are best positioned to take advantage of economic development opportunities in the future.
  • Fifth, we recommend a simplification and coordination of funding opportunities for Northern individuals, communities and businesses looking to develop local solutions, combined with a sharing network for projects and developers to communicate with case-study champions. A single-window platform to identify funding opportunities and a single-user application will encourage innovation and localization of food systems contributions and reduce the need to navigate multiple departmental and jurisdictional levels. A sharing network will allow for the communication of ideas, successes and challenges across the North to facilitate expansion of successes and minimize barriers.

Ultimately, our recommendations to enhance and support sustainable food systems in the North focus on increased participation and autonomy at the local level in the development and support of local solutions and local food production. All recommendations look to further Indigenous self-determination and self-governance through a distinctions-based approach. In combination with enhanced and simplified funding for local initiatives and sharing networks of Northern solutions, the North will be better positioned to support sustainable food systems and future economic development.


The NIEDB

Established in 1990, the National Indigenous Economic Development Board is a Ministerial appointed board mandated to provide strategic policy advice to the federal government on issues related to Indigenous economic development. Comprised of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis business and community leaders from across Canada, the Board helps governments to respond to the unique needs and circumstances of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Expanding the Circle: First Nations Economic Reconciliation

On February 15, 2017 at Westin in Ottawa, the National Indigenous Economic Development Board (NIEDB), in partnership with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA), Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the Public Policy Forum (PPF), presented Expanding the Circle: What Reconciliation and Inclusive Economic Growth Can Mean for First Nations and Canada?

Economic reconciliation means ensuring that Indigenous Peoples are not excluded from participating in and benefitting from Canada’s prosperity. The economic inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in Canada’s economy is not only a way of addressing past wrongs, but also an investment that can benefit all Canadians. In fact, closing the significant opportunity gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians will annually boost Canada’s GDP by $27.7 billion.

The Expanding the Circle series of conferences features leaders and experts from across the country. The conferences look at the importance of inclusive economic growth for reconciliation, and highlight solutions to address the significant gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians. The first of this three-part series focused on increasing economic opportunities for First Nations.

First Nations Conference (2017)

Through a series of panels, discussions and presentations, speakers talked about themes such as reconciliation, procurement strategies, and the importance of celebrating Indigenous achievements.


To learn more . . .

What We Heard: Roundtable on Northern Sustainable Food Systems

On Monday, June 4th, 2018, a wide variety of stakeholders and partners involved in Northern food systems attended a Roundtable event in Whitehorse, Yukon. Participants were from across the Northern territories and Inuit Nunangat and included:

  • Indigenous Elder
  • Representatives from Indigenous Organizations, Governments and Corporations
  • Federal, territorial and regional government representatives
  • Industry representatives
  • Non-profit groups and academics
  • Local food producers and food Co-ops
  • Commercial food distributors and retailers

Participants offered significant feedback, providing helpful insights on the development of NIEDB recommendations to address Northern sustainable food systems. The views expressed in this report are those of the participants at the event and reflect the discussions that occurred.

Read the report:

The NIEDB

Established in 1990, the National Indigenous Economic Development Board is a Governor in Council appointed board mandated to provide strategic policy advice to the federal government on issues related to Indigenous economic development. Comprised of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis business and community leaders from across Canada, the Board helps governments to respond to the unique needs and circumstances of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Dr. Marie Delorme Joins Order of Canada

The National Indigenous Economic Development Board would like to extend its most heartfelt congratulations to Dr. Marie Delorme for being named to the Order of Canada.

Dr. Delorme is CEO of The Imagination Group of Companies. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree, a Master of Business Administration from Queen’s University, and PhD from the University of Calgary. Her research focuses on inter-cultural leadership.

She has been recognized, “for her entrepreneurial leadership and for her commitment to promoting opportunities for women and Indigenous peoples in Canada.”

The Order of Canada is one of Canada’s highest civilian honours. It recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation.

 


To learn more . . .